Exciting Expansion of Quilting with Margaret

Posted By on November 19, 2017

20171117_101857Very excited to tell you that I will be expanding my space at the Hungerford to include Studio #309. They knocked a hole in the wall between the two studios Friday and framed out the new Archway. Monday the electricians will reroute the electricity around the archway and add some outlets. In January after the holidays they will paint walls, ceiling and floor to match my current space. To celebrate, I decided to host a Pop-Up Makers Market during the Hungerford’s holiday hours. So I have found several different local makers to share their handmade items in the new space.

The Pop-Up Makers Market will be open on the following days:

Black Friday, 11/24, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Small Business Saturday, 11/25, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
First Friday, 12/1, 5 – 9 p.m.
Holiday Saturdays, 12/2, 12/9 & 12/16, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

The Hungerford will be offering FREE Swag Bags to the first 20 visitors at door #2 on both Black Friday & Small Business Saturday. The Swag Bags are filled with coupons, an item from an artist at the Hungerford and lots more goodies. I will have free soup at my studio both days plus holiday cookies and warm spiced cider.

20171118_160223Pop-Up Makers Market will include different artists with locally handmade items  on various days:
Jess Mrva Schulte (baby blankies/lovies, adult & toddler aprons, kitchen & bath linens)
Laura Robinson (mosaic tile & magnets)
Michele Kurpisz (metalsmithed jewelry)
Scott “Jones” Hendershot (architectural photography)
Lori Massa-Prince (handcrafted jewelry)
Jane Bartett (hand-dyed clothing)
Heather Behrendt (lampwork beads)
Trudy Feikert (knitted yarn hats & fingerless glove creations)
…and more to be announced!

Stop by and check out what’s new at Quilting with Margaret.

2017 Handmade Holiday Retreat, October 27 – 29

Posted By on September 13, 2017

Quilted Artwork Frame

Quilted Artwork Frame

Join me at my studio for a weekend of fun with other makers. We will be making 6 handmade items, all which would make a perfect holiday gift. Learn techniques for working with some of the newest fabrics like Kraft-Tex, a eco-friendly leather-like paper fabric that is washable and can be sewn. The weekend includes meals, recipes, some patterns and will be a lot of fun. Bring your own sewing machine that you are used to using and set up your maker’s station on a table at my studio for the weekend. We will have hors d’oeuvres and punch and make a quick project, a quilted artwork frame, from 6 – 9 p.m. Friday night.

"Leather" Tech Stand

“Leather” Tech Stand

Then return on Saturday morning (10 a.m. – 5 p.m.) for hot coffee, tea and a continental breakfast. In the morning we will make a “leather” tech stand from Kraft-Tex. After a box lunch, we will do another Kraft-Tex project, a Ready-to-Travel Backgammon board. Then we will finish up the afternoon making a “leather” & ribbon key fob from your scraps. These eco-friendly items make great gifts for men, women or children.

Sunday (10 a.m. – 5 p.m.) we will make a couple of fabric gift items, both from Terry Atkinson Designs. In the morning we will work on a Zippy Strippy zippered bag made from 2 1/2″ strips. Then in the afternoon, we will make a fat sack which is great for carrying groceries, but also would work well as a reusable gift bag. Also, on Sunday, enjoy a warm brunch with bottomless coffee, tea and water.

Don’t miss this annual retreat! Read more on the Handmade Holiday retreat page of this website and download a signup brochure here.

"Leather" & Ribbon Key Fob

“Leather” & Ribbon Key Fob

Fat Sack

Fat Sack

Ready-to-Travel Backgammon

Ready-to-Travel Backgammon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zippy Strippy Zippered Bag

Zippy Strippy Zippered Bag

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fabric Sale Sept. 1 – 10

Posted By on August 31, 2017

IMG_20170830_112643_733Just got in a new shipment of fabric, 25+ bolts! Stop in and check them out over the next week and take advantage of this special sale. All fabrics at my studio are regularly just $7.50/yard, but for the next ten days: buy 8 yards or more of fabric and get them at just $6/yard. This sale includes all of the new fabrics too. I will be open Friday, September 1 for First Friday from 6 – 9 p.m. and will also be open Saturday, by appointment. Call or text me if you want me to meet you there Saturday or any specific time next week. I also plan to be at my studio during next week in the afternoons, 1 – 4 p.m.

Also, on First Friday I will have a class list of fall quilt classes available at my studio. Stop in to see samples and sign up. I will also be taking signups for the April 26 – 29, 2018 Get-Away Weekend at Beaver Hollow. Special discount available if you pay in full by September 25. And as mentioned before, I will be hosting guest artist, Eileen Deloff, who makes pillows from African fabrics. She will have these for sale along with African made baskets, shea butter and black soap. All proceeds help support medical missions in Ghana.

This will be a fun and special First Friday with African inspired snacks and music. Stop by the Hungerford, Studio #307 and join the fun!

First Friday, September 1, 6 – 9 p.m.

Posted By on August 24, 2017

ASAP First FridayOn First Friday in September, I will be welcoming Eileen Deloff, from A.S.A.P. (Americans Serving Abroad Project). She will have beautiful handmade pillows for sale.  She sews these pillows from African fabric that she bought last March when she visited Ghana. The proceeds from pillow sales support health and education in impoverished communities in Africa. She will also have baskets that were designed and handwoven with love by women of the ASIGE Project in Bolgatanga Ghana. Purchase of a basket gives these women the ability to support their families and the hope for a better future. Proceeds also support the purchase of essential medications and supplies for healthcare mission trips to remote villages in Ghana through A.S.A.P. Also for sale will be black soap and shea butter. Please stop by the studio and help support this wonderful cause.

You can also check out the new quilt fabrics that recently arrived at the studio. All fabrics are regularly just $7.50 per yard.  And I will be taking signups for fall classes and the 2018 Annual Get-Away Weekend at Beaver Hollow scheduled for  April 26 – 29. The weekend is starting to fill up already, so get your deposit down if you want to join us.

September’s First Friday will be on Friday, September 1, from 6 – 9 p.m. As always, First Friday is a wonderful evening to wonder around the Hungerford building and check out all of the varied artists’ studios. There are four floors with over 100 different studios featuring painters, photographers, sculptors, ceramics artists, potters, glass artists, jewelry artists, fiber artists and more. It’s a great place to find a one-of-a-kind gift while supporting local artists and locally-owned businesses.

2018 Get-Away All Set

Posted By on August 17, 2017

Our spacious classroom in the Fireside Room

Our spacious classroom in the Fireside Room

Everyone had such a wonderful time at the 2017 Get-Away at Beaver Hollow in April, that we will be returning there in April of 2018. They have given us the same prices and the dates will be April 27 – 29, with an optional add-on night, Thursday, April 26. We all enjoyed the spacious 3000 square foot Fireside Room where everyone had a large workstation and an ergonomic adjustable office chair. The food was exceptional and plentiful. And the evening bonfire with s’mores was a definite favorite where we all got to know each other a little better.

Also, if you didn’t attend this year, having the extra full day on Friday for everyone really made a difference. Because of that, I was able to spread out the special activities over the full weekend so that everyone had plenty of quilting time on both Friday and Saturday. I’m sure those of you who hadn’t come for the extra day previously, really noticed a difference this year with being able to sew all day Friday. And for those of us who opted for the extra night Thursday, it seemed like a really long and rejuvenating retreat.

So if you are interested in joining us in 2018 at  Beaver Hollow, you can download a sign-up brochure here:

2018 Sign-Up Brochure

A $200 deposit saves your space, with the remainder due by March 10, 2018. You can pay monthly, or if you pay in full by September 25, 2017, you will receive a coupon for 2 free open studios and 2 free yards of fabric (a $55 value). you can pay by check, cash, or credit card (with a 3% credit card fee added). I sent out an email to past retreaters and have already gotten lots of responses, so I expect the Get-Away to fill up fast. Looking forward to an even better Get-Away Weekend in 2018!

Want to find out more about this weekend? Stop by my Studio #307 at the Hungerford, 1115 East Main Street for First Friday, September 1, 6 – 9 p.m. The weekend is already starting to fill up!

mmm...s'mores!

mmm…s’mores!

Who's going to win Quilt Bingo?

Who’s going to win Quilt Bingo?

Cut, cut, cut those scraps!

Cut, cut, cut those scraps!

"Vanna's" Coronation

“Vanna’s” Coronation

Sunday's big Show & Tell inspired us all.

Sunday’s big Show & Tell inspired us all.

Connie works on a colorful creation.

Connie works on a colorful creation.

New Fabric at the Studio

Posted By on July 28, 2017

Tula Pink's "Eden"

Tula Pink’s “Eden”

Just got a couple of Tula Pink “Eden” backorders in at the studio last week. If you haven’t been by the studio for awhile, I got a bunch of new Tula Pink fabrics in in April. Let me know (text me at 831-2566) if you want to stop by and take a peak. I’ve been coming to my studio mainly by appointment only this summer. It’s been a crazy summer for me, getting my mom settled in Rochester. She moved here from Ohio and will be living with us.

Burst Block in progress

Burst Block in progress

But I have been able to sneak away several times to go to the studio and quilt. I just finished piecing this baby/wall hanging made with a Man Sewing burst block template, which I now sell at my studio. It’s an interesting and challenging block to cut and piece.  But recently I’ve decided that quilting the quilt is my favorite part of quiltmaking.  And I’m currently quilting a modern quilt top with “ghost” blocks.  Thanks to my new portable air conditioner at the studio, it’s not to hot to work there! I’ve been busily trying to finish some new pieces for a special show in September of 2018. I will tell you know more about this show as it develops.

Tuesday Tips & Tools: Pressing

Posted By on June 13, 2017

Ironing machineIt’s Tuesday and after skipping several weeks of posting Tuesday Tips and Tools I’m back on track, I hope! It’s been a little hectic here getting my mom settled in at our house. In April she decided to take us up on our offer for her to move in with us. So expect to see Helen at the studio more in the future. My mom was never really a quilter, although many of you have met her at one of my midnight retreats or this year’s get-away weekend. She has made a couple of runners over the last few years, but she doesn’t consider herself a quilter. But she used to knit my brother and I a pair of mittens every winter when I was a kid. And she has made me many Easter dresses, an occasional coat and helped me learn to sew. She can tailor a suit and made my wedding dress. She’s a retired home economics teacher, so need I say more. She didn’t teach me to quilt, but I got my love of fabric and sewing naturally from her. And although I never knew her mom (my grandma), she was a quilter and sewer, and I am fortunate to have a couple of her quilts.

When I was a little girl, I remember laundry day and my mom ironing all of our clothes. She would keep an old 7-Up bottle filled with water and a plastic sprinkler lid on the top in the refrigerator. She used a dry iron and sprinkled the clothes with water and rolled them up in a towel until she ironed them. I used to help her and iron my dad’s cotton handkerchiefs. She had these metal stretchers that she used to stretch my dad’s trousers on so they didn’t need to be pressed. I remember the day she found an electric “ironing machine” (I think that was what she called it) at a household sale. She was so excited to buy this efficient time-saver that would mean less time spent ironing sheets, tablecloths and anything flat. She taught me to iron and as I got older, the weekly family laundry became one of my chores. Fortunately, by then there were permanent press clothes and ironing was not an entire day chore.

I was always taught to iron-as-you-go when sewing garments. And I learned from experience that if you did this, your garment always came out better and looked more professional. Everything laid flatter, corners were sharper and things went together easier and better when you ironed-as-you-go. The same thing is true with quilting. However, the rules are different when quilting. Which leads us to:

TIP #1: We don’t call it “ironing” when quilting…we call it “pressing.” And that’s because the proper way to press seams is to “press” them or apply pressure to the seam with a hot iron and not slide the iron around to avoid stretching seams and bias edges. That means pick the iron up and place it down on the seam, no sliding or “ironing.” I’m sure all of my students out there have heard me say many times, “Press, don’t iron!”

TIP #2: “Set the seam” before you press it to one side or the other. Setting the seam means pressing the two seams together from the wrong side with the side you will be pressing towards on the top. This sets the stitches. If you are pressing two long width-of-fabric strips that have been sewn together (for strip piecing), lay the two strips on the ironing board in a straight (not curved) line. This is why I prefer to have ironing board covers with a grid printed on them instead of a cute print. You can use the line as a guide to keep your long strip straight. Remember to put the dark side (or the side you will be pressing the seams towards) on top. Next press down the seam in an up and down motion to “set” the seam and never slide the iron or the tip of the iron down the seam or you will stretch it. If you don’t have a straight line on your ironing board cove, you can always draw one with a permanent pen.

TIP #3: Lastly, use your fingers to gently open the fabric so it will be right-side-up and follow your finger down the seam “pressing” the seam over to the top fabric, usually the darker fabric. However, sometimes we press to the lighter fabric if it reduces bulk. so always anticipate the next step when choosing how to press, since most patterns fail to tell you this important step of which way to press the seams. You don’t want to pull the fabric open too hard or you will flip the seam back towards the bottom fabric. That why I like to follow along behind my finger with the iron.

Thermal ThimblesTIP #4: Never use steam when pressing seams, as this will only stretch the fabric. Also, if you use steam when pressing long strips open as discussed above, the steam will burn your fingers. And if you don’t have asbestos hands like I do, you may want to purchase a quilting notion: thermal thimbles to protect your fingertips from getting burned by the iron.

TIP #5: It’s ok to use steam when you are pressing or actually ironing your fabric before cutting. Also, many people like to use a product called “Best Press” which works like starch, but is archival and won’t attract bugs to your fabric like spray starch. However, I recently read “never put water in your iron” claiming that your iron will last much longer and you will never have any unfortunate leaks or spitting on your fabric. The article suggested spritzing your fabric with water from a spray bottle or using Best Press. I can say from experience the when trying to remove folds and wrinkles from fabric, the wrinkles almost fall out with the heat from the iron after the fabric has been spritzed with Best Press.

TIP #6: When piecing lots of small squares or triangles into pairs, “chain piecing” saves lots of time. It also is handy to leave the pieces chained together until after pressing. Take the whole chain to the ironing board and press, then cut the units apart.

TIP #7: Always press from the right-side not the back-side to void pressing “pleats” in the unit which will be nearly impossible to un-press or press out. The only time I press from the back side is when I occasionally press seams open to avoid bulk. But I always follow up by flipping the unit over and doing a final press on the right-side. The best time to press seams open is when you make stars where lots of seams come together in the center. Again always “press” not iron the seams open in this case. Running the point down the seam will stretch it and your star centers won’t lay flat. A seam roll helps a lot when pressing seams open.

TIP #8: When piecing two pieces together and one seam is bias and the other is straight of grain, always pin and make sure to match up the ends. Then if the bias edge is longer because it stretched while handling or cutting, ease the excess in with pins. Now here’s the magic tip: Put the fuller or bias side on top and set the iron on the seam. the heat from the iron will magically shrink the longer stretched side right back to its original size. Now they will fit together perfectly when you sew them.

press to dark sideTIP #9: I know quilters are always taught to “press to the dark side.” But sometimes it actually works better to press to the lighter side when you want to eliminate bulk. Also when you want a piece in you quilt to appear to come forward when you look at it, you should press the seams toward that piece. This is especially helpful when doing landscape quilting. But it also works when you want the background fabric to appear further back and highlight the star or applique by pressing so they appear to be on top of the background.

Well, I guess I made up for skipping the past few weeks of Tuesday Tips by giving an entire lesson on pressing! Hope I didn’t lose you halfway through. See you next Tuesday for some more quilting tips and tools.

 

Tuesday Tips & Tools

Posted By on May 23, 2017

Today I want to kick off a weekly blog on tips and/or tools which will make quilting easier. I’ve been planning to do this for a long time now and am finally getting around to it. Check back every Tuesday and learn a new quilting tip or learn about a tool. This week I want to share some everyday items that you may not have thought to use while quilting. I shared these with the retreaters at my Get-Away weekend a few weeks ago.

  1. 20170522_171426Q-Tips Cotton Swabs. Q-tips make it easy to clean the lint out of your sewing machine. The cotton swab end acts like a magnet to “grab” the lint right out of those hard to reach areas. And instead of just brushing the lint aside, it sticks right to the cotton swab. Never blow into your machine to remove lint. It creates moisture which can damage your machine and may push the lint more inside your machine. Also, after using a blue washout marker to mark your quilt for quilting, use a cotton swab dipped in water to dab over markings and remove them. This is especially helpful if you don’t want to wash your quilt yet, but need to remove the blue marks. When the quilt dries, always make sure the blue marks are gone. If not repeat until they are gone.
  2. Graphite Pencil. Lightly mark your quilt lines with a graphite pencil and it will create a light shadow to emphasize your hand quilting stitches.
  3. Post-It Notes. Use a small stack (8 – 10) of Post-It notes to mark your 1/4″ line on your sewing machine. Stick a small stack on your sewing machine in front of your pressure foot where the edge of your fabric should be for a perfect 1/4″ seam allowance. It’s removable when necessary to change a bobbin and gives you a nice “lip” to sew against assuring a perfect 1/4″ seam allowance every time.
  4. Orange Wood Manicure Sticks. A manicure stick makes a great stiletto to guide fabric through your sewing machine.
  5. Pencil Grips. Use a rubber pencil grip to put on the sharp tips of your scissors to protect the point from damage and to protect your fingers from the sharp points when you are digging your scissors out of your notions bag.

Check back every Tuesday for various tips and uses for special tools to make your quilting easier and faster.

Special Sip ‘n Shop, Wednesday, May 24, 5 – 7 p.m.

Posted By on May 22, 2017

paraffin dipfabricStop by the studio for this month’s Sip ‘n Shop on Wednesday, May 24, from 5 – 7 p.m. and get a free paraffin hand dip to moisturize those dry winter hands. Enjoy a glass of bubbly and check out all of the new Westminster fabrics that just came in. Lots of new Tula Pink designs and some new black-and-whites, to mention just a few. All cotton quilter’s fabrics are just $7.50 per yard.

Also, browse lots of new patterns and some new plastic templates. Stop in to see a demo on how to use one of the new templates to make a really fun and easy contemporary quilt block.

Find me in the Hungerford building at 1115 East Main Street on the third floor in Studio #307. I’m open once a month on Wednesday evenings from 5 – 7 p.m. for a Sip ‘n Shop, most First Fridays from 6 – 9 p.m. and Second Saturdays from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

 

Massive Yarn Mural in Rochester

Posted By on May 15, 2017

Susan B. Anthony yarn muralHave you seen the massive yarn mural in Rochester’s Susan B. Anthony Preservation District at the corner of West Main Street and Canal Street? According to a Democrat and Chronicle article, the bright pink crochet mural consists of 351 two-foot-by-two foot blocks and measures 26′ x 54′. It consists of 150 pounds of yarn. My mom and I drove by it last week and stopped to look closer and take a picture. It’s quite impressive! And it covers the second story side of the building where a Sew Green Rochester is located. The mural is part of the Harriet Tubman Yarn Muralproject “Love Across the USA” launched by New York City-based multimedia artist Agata “Olek” Oleksiak.  She plans to install one creation in each state by 2020, with each yarn mural honoring a strong female figure in U.S. history. The Susan B. Anthony yarn mural is the second project following a Harriet Tubman yarn mural installed at the Schweinfurth Art Center in Auburn, NY.